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Fact Sheets
Feeding Sick or Injured Horses
by Dr Nerida Richards

Sick or injured horses, including horses suffering from burns have different requirements to normal healthy horses, both in the types of nutrients they need and the sorts of feeds they can be fed. To determine the best thing to feed sick or injured horses the following guidelines should be followed:

 

 

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Equine Gastric Ulcers
Using Feeding Management to Reduce Their Incidence and Severity

by Dr Nerida Richards

Equine gastric ulcer syndrome (EGUS) is a major equine health problem worldwide. Some studies have reported an incidence of ulcers in performance horses in excess of 90% of horses training. A more recent study conducted in Western Australia found 53% of horses had ulcers.

Ulcers negatively and sometimes severely affect a horse’s ability to perform. They cause pain and discomfort, reduce a horse’s appetite which in turn limits its capacity to maintain bodyweight and lead to the development of vices including windsucking and crib biting.

While gastric ulcers have long been recognised as a major health concern there seemingly wasn’t much progress made in preventing them in performance horses. New research conducted in Australia and the USA is however starting to shine some light on how ulcers can be avoided.

 

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Preparing a Horse for Show or Sale
Getting the Shine, Condition, Topline and Muscling

by Dr Nerida Richards

Photos by Berni Saunders

Preparing a horse for show or sale revolves around getting them to look the best they possibly can on the day to impress the judge or buyer. Coat shine, muscling, topline and condition are all critical pieces in the preparation puzzle and feeding plays a major role in achieving the look you want. So what types of feeds and supplements will do the job for you?

 

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Feeding a Horse with Laminitis
by Dr Nerida Richards

Feeding a horse with a history of laminitis can be a time consuming and confusing task and one that, if not done properly, can have painful consequences for your horse.

The laminitic horse’s diet needs to be low in sugar (we could get all very technical here and call sugars non-structural carbohydrates, water soluble carbohydrates, starches, ether soluble carbohydrates or non-fibre carbohydrates, but let’s just keep it simple and say ‘sugar’). Sugars in feeds cause a horses blood insulin to rise after eating and this is what researchers now believe triggers most cases of laminitis and certainly most cases of grass or pasture laminitis.

 

 

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Yearling Prep - Have You Got the Look?
by Dr Nerida Richards

Preparing a yearling for sale revolves around getting them to look the best they possibly can on the day to attract and impress the buyer. Coat shine, muscling, topline and condition are all critical pieces in the preparation puzzle and feeding plays a major role in achieving the look you want. So what types of feeds and supplements will do the job for you?

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